Dozen Trypophobia Face Images

In this gallery you see a dozen of our favorite trypophobia images of all time! These are all focused on the face! Some are makeup, some are acne, some are Photoshopped images. Take a look at each and come back every week for all sorts of trypophobia and dermatology updates!




Wikipedia says: Trypophobia is not a diagnosis in the American Psychiatric Association’s Diagnostic and Statistical Manual, Fifth Edition (DSM-5) and it is rarely used in scientific literature, according to Jennifer Abbasi of Popular Science.[1][4] Abbasi said, “professionals who study and treat phobias tend not to use all the Latin and Greek names that get tossed around on message boards and in the press.”[4] However, on blogs and in internet forums, thousands of people claim to have trypophobia. Psychiatrist Carol Mathews said, “There might really be people out there with phobias to holes, because people can really have a phobia to anything, but just reading what’s on the Internet, that doesn’t seem to be what people actually have.” According to Mathews, most people writing online are likely disgusted by these types of images without meeting criteria for a real phobia.


A now defunct website, trypophobia.com, describes the phenomenon with videos and images. Images containing clusters of holes are presented in an arrangement that claims to rank the likelihood they will induce fear. Early images in the series include fruits such as oranges and pomegranates. Then, clusters of holes with a possible association with danger are presented, such as honeycombs, frogs, and insects and arachnids. Finally, images feature wounds and diseases. Using data from the site, Wilkins and Cole analyzed example images and believe that the images had “unique characteristics”.[9] They state that the reaction behind the phobia was an “unconscious reflex reaction” based on a “primitive portion of the brain that associates the image with something dangerous”.[6][7] In another research article, Le, Cole and Wilkins developed a symptom questionnaire that they say can be used to identify trypophobia.